Dragon’s Bloodline — Chapter 31

Fell asleep midway through the day so this turned out a bit late. Oops~

The author seems to use the format of <magic type>MAGIC for things like ‘space-time magic’ or ‘recovery magic’. For these, I keep ‘magic’ in the term for obvious reasons. However, there’s also the case of things like ‘Fireball’ or ‘Identify’ where the format is <magic name>のMAGIC.

I’ve been flat-out dropping the ‘magic’ from my translation due to it sounding awkward in English.

Are you guys alright with this? In some of the previous chapters I’ve kept it when they use Identify since they often alternate between talking about identifying something and using the magic Identify, but I’ve tried to remove it from the rest of the spells.

Thoughts?

Well, either way — enjoy the chapter!

(~’.’)~ Read Chapter Here ~(‘.’~)


P.S. I know it won’t matter to most of you, but I’m currently reformatting all of the Dragon’s Bloodline chapters I’ve posted to be the same as what I’m doing now.

3 thoughts on “Dragon’s Bloodline — Chapter 31

  1. Tnx for the translation, as ever 🙂
    And yeah, so long as it’s clear (that its magical) when implicit, language allows you to leave it out. I dont see anything wrong with your usage 🙂

    What sounds far more awkward, however, is translators using “magic” as a singular noun, while that doesn’t exist (like water. you can use water, but you cant use a water).
    It is a formless ‘mass’. Good to see someone use the term correctly 🙂

    As for possible errors…
    Managed to find a few 😛

    He was also bored on the journey
    He was also bored on this journey
    He was also bored [right now]

    When the Skill’s level increases, it would (wrong tense combination in a single sentence)
    When the Skill’s level increases, it will

    wood-framed prisons.
    wood-framed cages. (a prion refers to more than just a cage. And these are mobile to boot)

    they discussed how to deal with them in specifics.(awkward usage, since it’s a combination of the following 2)
    they discussed how to deal with them in detail.
    they discussed the specifics/details of how to deal with them.
    they discussed how to deal with them.(also possible :P, since ‘in detail’ is implicit)

    Ten years of being reincarnated
    Ten years after being reincarnated (as the reincarnation process has long since ended)

    hit you all on accident
    hit you all by accident

    on the armor
    on their armor (as it is specific)

    Two knights were fainted, they tied them up with ropes and left them.
    Two knights had fainted, so they tied them up with ropes and left them.
    (actually, I’m not 100% sure ‘were fainted’ is wrong. It just sounds wrong since I’ve never seen that form before despite reading quite a few fantasy works, whereas I have seen it in the 2nd form)

    with solemn expression
    with a solemn expression

    1. Sorry for taking so long to take a look at this… I’ve been a) lazy and b) throwing myself at GCR 2.

      *reading these for the first time*

      Agreed with [magic] vs [magics]

      [the journey] -> [this journey]

      Not exactly a tense shift, using a hypothetical situation in the future implied by [when] & [would]. Might be awkwardly worded, though.

      [prisons] -> [cages] — Used prisons as it was explicitly stated as such, but looking back at it now it does sound awkward.

      Not awkward usage, commonly used in English literature. Well.. maybe not common? Still, it’s used. To talk in specifics is to discuss in detail.

      Keeping as is. Stated as being reincarnated, not that it happened in the past. I assume the author means that reincarnated is referring to the event and their lives after in the same word.

      That’s just being picky~ Both are common uses in contemporary speech! I picked the one used more often by youths nowadays as it’s stated Serge acts and talks as a child would.

      [the] -> [their]

      [Two knights were fainted, they tied them up with ropes and left them] -> [They tied the two fainted knights up and left them] — Translated this line directly and forgot to shift into a more proper English sentence structure.

      Adding that ‘a’~

      ____

      Thanks for pointing out the errors!

    2. Just had a long, -interesting- conversation with my family about this sentence (due to reasons):

      [When the Skill’s level increases, it would supposedly make using magic take less magical power.]

      After many… many revisions:

      [When the Skill’s level increases, supposedly it would make using magic take less magical power.]

      … For the record, my final thought on it was:

      [Supposedly, when the Skill’s level increases, it would make using magic take less magical power.]

      … But it was thought to have too many pauses and thus scrapped.

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